Archives 
The archivist at Scholars Archive, the UAlbany institutional archive, offered to take my CV and the preprints on my website and add them as entries to the archive. It's now done.

A search for works by me in the archive turns up various editions of forall x at the top, because I've been using Scholars Archive for the last revision or two of the book. But below that there are entries for lots of papers.

I'm not sure if this will make my work available or salient to anyone who wouldn't have gotten it anyway, since I have the papers on my personal website. I figure it can't hurt.

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Special issues 
If this blog platform had a more fluid system for tagging, there'd be a category for Synthese scandal. The journal has recently been tarnished (again) by egregious problems with a special issue. The philosophy blogosphere lit up with it a week or two ago. If you missed it, the post at Daily Nous covers the essentials.

Unlike earlier debacles, however, the editors have responded to this in a responsible way before the petitions were drawn up and boycotts were organized. They've made a public apology for the mess. They have announced a moratorium on future special issues so that they can take a serious look at the process, although issues already underway will go forward. Well done!

I have a paper on natural kinds forthcoming in a special issue of Synthese. As I blogged earlier, they refereed it thoroughly.

On reflection, I think it is important for there to be reputable journals which publish special issues of conference papers. It seems to me that the alternatives are (a) that conference papers not be published at all or (b) that they be published as stand-alone volumes. Not publishing at all would be a shame. The Paris symposium where I presented my paper brought together several of us doing related work on natural kinds, and it makes sense for the work we presented to appear together somewhere. And stand-along volumes are often only carried by a few libraries, so the papers don't get widely read. Having the papers appear in Synthese at least gives them a chance at readership.

There is a the third option, (c) that the papers would simply be made freely available from an on-line archive. This would be optimal, I think, although the authors might not feel an impetus to edit and complete their contributions. Conditional on closed-access journals being a thing that we still do, special issues of journal are valuable.

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paratodo x 
A while ago, I was contacted by José Gascón about translating forall x. The open license already gave him permission, but he reached out anyway.

A few days ago, he sent me paratodo x. Because of the spacing of the title, I read this as "paradox" at first. Then I had an uncanny moment of not knowing what that "t" was doing in the middle of the word. Finally, I sorted out what I was looking at.

I think this is a cool resource, so I posted a copy at the UAlbany institutional archive. The LaTeX source files are included, so the Spanish edition can take on a life of its own.

Link: paratodo x: Una Introducción a la Lógica Formal

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Kind of published 
My paper Kind of Borrowed, Kind of Blue has been accepted at the Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism. It's a philosophical reflection on the 2014 note-for-note remake of "Kind of Blue" by the combo Mostly Other People Do the Killing.

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Other open access logic books 
I realized today that forall x is almost ten years old. I wrote it in the summer of 2005, mostly at the Peet's on Villa La Jolla Drive, and released version 1.0 on July 13 of that year.

I recently heard about A Concise Introduction to Logic, a book that Craig DeLancey of SUNY Oswego is for the OpenSUNY initiative. When they did their call for proposals, forall x wasn't eligible because it had the demerit of already existing!

I learned today about the Open Logic Project, masterminded by Richard Zach (Calgary) with an all-star list of editors and contributors. Unlike forall x, it's an intermediate level book.

Zach and company are using Github to automate bug reports and feature requests, which is an idea I really like. The LaTeX source files of forall x are freely available and it has forked multiple times, but I still maintain the original version on my own computer. I occasionally get corrections and requests, but by e-mail. Alas, I suspect most users of forall x are not the sort of people who would submit corrections and requests that way anyhow.

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