LeWitt (1968) x Conway (1970) 
Divide a wall into a square grid. Mark arbitrary grid elements with a horizontal line about one-fifth of the way down in the square.

For every cell that was marked to begin with, if it is adjacent to two or three marked squares, mark it with another horizontal line about two-fifths of the way down in the square.
For every unmarked cell, mark it with a line if exactly three of the adjacent grid elements are marked.

Repeat with lines horizontal lines three-fifths of the way down, based on the previous lines.

Continue for a total of twenty sets of lines: The fifth set of lines will be at the bottom of the squares. For the sixth set of lines, mark vertical lines one-fifth of the way across the square... and so on. For the eleventh set of lines, mark diagonal lines one-fifth of the way across. For the sixteenth set, mark diagonal lines which slope in the other direction.

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Cited more often than the norm 
Justin at Daily Nous quotes the statistic that "82 per cent of articles published in humanities are not even cited once." Turning this around, only 18% are cited.

I was curious about how my own papers fared in this regard. Starting with data from Google Scholar and correcting some, 68% of my publications have been cited. One of the corrections was to dismiss articles which were only cited by me in another article. Counting self-citations, the rate jumps to 78%.

In a more self-serving mood, but the quality of my work is only one factor here.

Another factor is that all of my papers are readily available on-line. Once there's a draft worth sharing, I post it to my website. I update it with my final draft once it's accepted for publication, and I continue to make it available. The result is that people who are puttering around on a topic are likely to come across my work, and then they can cite me. This is certainly how forall x, my open-access logic textbook, has come to be cited 11 times. And I have some conference papers and working drafts which have been cited even though they've never been available anywhere but on my website.

In discussions of whether to post papers on-line or not, people underrate the advantages. People who notice my work because it's on-line almost never tell me about, but sometimes they do cite me.

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Counting journals that count 
There is administrative pressure, for purposes of tenure and promotion, to list the top philosophy journals. Some disciplines have lists which are approved by their professional organizations. So people from outside the department are sometimes incredulous that philosophy doesn't.

But we don't. Letter writers for T&P cases tend to say this but then waive their hands at the relative status of various journals, possibly linking to a blog post or something.

I have recently thought that it would be good to have a general statement about this for administrative purposes, rather than putting something together on an ad hoc basis for every case. Below the fold is a draft of what a general statement might look like. It's an alpha version, and I am not confidently committed to other the contents or the form of presentation. So quoting it without that proviso is likely to earn my wrath. Talking about it as a possibly half-baked blog post is fine, though, and I'd appreciate feedback.
Read More...

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On the MAP 
Since last year, UAlbany has had a chapter of Minorities and Philosophy (M.A.P.). The organization is largely student run, and they've gotten funding from several sources to bring in a guest speaker for a symposium this Friday.

Readers in the capital region should note that it's open to the public.

Symposium on Implicit Bias


Friday, March 27
2:00pm to 5:30pm
Humanities 354, UAlbany uptown campus

Here is the schedule:

2:00 Adefolaji Fasanya, UAlbany M.A.P. President "Introduction to Implicit Bias"
2:15 Henry Curtis "Can you be racist without knowing it?"
2:30 Scott Wolcott "Implicit Bias and the Police"
3:00 Intermission with Food and Refreshments
3:30 Keynote Address: Professor Michael Brownstein (CUNY) "Implicit Bias and the Credibility of Moral Intuition".

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Hiring news 
PhilJobs, which hosts the on-line incarnation of Jobs for Philosophers, also hosts PhilJobs: Appointments. I just got an e-mail asking me to confirm a bit of news, so they could post it. If it's fit for them to post, it's fit for me to post.

I'm happy to say that Monika Piotrowska, who works in bioethics and philosophy of biology, will be joining the University at Albany philosophy department next year.

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